William Blair Celebrates Anne Frank at Illinois Holocaust Museum

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Eva Berendsen, Anne Frank Educational Centre; Fritzie Fritzshall, Holocaust survivor and Illinois Holocaust Museum president; Philipp Mohr, William Blair partner; Susan Abrams, CEO of Illinois Holocaust Museum; and Laura Coy, William Blair director of philanthropy strategy


From left Eva Berendsen, with the Anne Frank Educational Centre; Fritzie Fritzshall, Holocaust survivor and Illinois Holocaust Museum president; Philipp Mohr, William Blair partner; Susan Abrams, CEO of Illinois Holocaust Museum; and Laura Coy, William Blair director of philanthropy strategy.


William Blair celebrated its cherished partnerships with the Anne Frank Educational Centre in Frankfurt and the Illinois Holocaust Museum on April 30 to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the birth of the courageous diarist who died in a Nazi concentration camp.

Holocaust survivors, dignitaries, clients and colleagues attended the evening reception at the Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois.

The gathering honored and remembered the legacy of Anne Frank born on June 12, 1929, in Frankfurt and died at age 15 in the Bergen-Belsen camp in Germany.

It was also an evening to celebrate the 5th anniversary of the Anne Frank Art Contest, inspired by Anne's legacy and Philipp Mohr, head of William Blair's Frankfurt office who founded the competition.

The Anne Frank Centre hosts the annual contest to engage the next generation in citizenship and promote the elimination of prejudice and racism. It attracts hundreds of participants and culminates with Anne Frank Day, a national celebration in Frankfurt.

Mohr was the featured speaker at the event and spoke of growing up in Germany, learning about the horrors of the Holocaust, and developing a passion not to forget the past.

Philipp Mohr, head of William Blair’s Frankfurt office, and Susan Abrams, CEO of the Illinois Holocaust Museum
Philipp Mohr and Susan Abrams at the Anne Frank event.

"Overall, art brings these things together and you work through some of the problems through art," Mohr said.

"I'm very humbled to stand here as a German in the Holocaust Museum. At the same time, I'm extremely proud that I can be here to share something that is important to me," he said citing the inspiring student art work on display.

Susan Abrams, CEO of the Holocaust Museum, reminded the crowd of the museum's mission to use history to combat prejudice and inspire others to be "upstanders as opposed to bystanders, recognizing the power of one's voice to make the world a better place."

Eva Berendsen, head of communications for the Anne Frank Centre, said: "We found a recipe to motivate youth which is to connect. To connect history with the present and the future. To connect young people by art. And last but not least: to connect them with Anne Frank."

Additional speakers included Fritzie Fritzshall, Holocaust survivor and Illinois Holocaust Museum president. Guests viewed award-winning art from the German art competition and were among the first to experience a hologram of Eva Schloss, Anne Frank's step-sister, in the museum's Take A Stand Center.

News Alerts

Stay connected to your favorite publications and news features.

Subscribe Now